Dioxin – Scientific Analysis

This letter is reprinted with permission from the Environmental Working Group, a CHE partner. See the original letter with full science analysis on EWG’s website.  

Dr. Timothy Buckley, Chair
Dioxin Review Panel
Science Advisory Board
Environmental Protection Agency (EPA)
Washington, DC

Dear Dr. Buckley,

Twenty-five years after publishing its first assessment of dioxin, a common industrial pollutant and food contaminant, the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) has yet to establish a safe daily dose for human exposure to this potent chemical.

Dioxin (2,3,7,8-Tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin, also known as 2,3,7,8-TCDD, or TCDD) may well be one of the most-studied of all chemical pollutants. The U.S. National Toxicology Program has listed dioxin as a known human carcinogen since 2001 (NTP 2005), and the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency has proposed to do the same (EPA 2010a). There is a large and persuasive body of research dating from the 1950s showing that dioxin undermines fetal development, damages the reproductive and immune systems and causes severe skin ailments and other disorders.

As U.S. industrial data demonstrate, dioxin is released from municipal waste incinerators; industrial and military hazardous waste treatment facilities; pesticide manufacturing and paper bleaching plants; and a wide range of other industrial processes. In the 1970s, dioxin was identified as a contaminant in Agent Orange, the notorious defoliant deployed by the U.S. during the Vietnam War and blamed for diabetes and other diseases among exposed personnel (Chamie 2008; Cranmer 2000; Gupta 2006).

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