Your Health: Lead at Home

image of a child running tap waterWith substantial media focus on the tap water situation in Flint, Michigan, and beyond in the last few weeks, many people are concerned about lead levels in their tap water. This concern is well founded, for lead has devastating impacts on our health, and especially on children’s health. There is no amount of lead exposure that is considered safe for children—even the smallest exposures can impact health.

What does lead do? From CHE’s Practice Prevention column on lead:

High levels of lead in children can lead to anemia, stomach and kidney problems, muscle weakness, brain damage and ultimately death. Even very low levels of exposure can affect a child’s mental and physical growth. Studies have linked elevated blood-lead levels in children with reduced intelligence, slowed mental development, attention deficit hyperactivity disorder, increased risk for delinquency and criminal behavior, heightened risk of obesity and delayed onset of puberty.

Lead at home can lurk in several places:

Continue reading

Advertisements

Mental Health: A Heightened Recognition of the Role of Toxic Chemicals

written by Elise Miller, EdM
Director

For the first time the American Psychological Association’s (APA) Monitor on Psychology magazine featured a cover story (Oct 2015) on the impact toxic chemicals can have on the developing brain. It makes sense that if chemical exposures can undermine children’s learning capacities, then they might be implicated in mental health problems as well. However, there has been scant research in or recognition of the latter in mainstream psychology. image from the APA articleThe publication of this article suggests that this sector may now be starting to take these concerns more seriously.

Continue reading

Top 10: 4th Quarter 2015

This is the last of CHE’s public quarterly Top 10 lists. We have selected studies and issues that we feel are significant in the field of environmental health, either because of their impact, their implications or their insight. Topics are listed in no particular order. Comments are welcome, as is always true with our blog posts. Corrected in an update 1/6/2016.

Continue reading

We Asked. You Responded. You Can Still Respond: Surveys of CHE’s Working Groups.

During the last quarter of 2015 CHE surveyed our listserv participants about the value of each listserv in their personal and professional lives, also asking for suggestions for improving each listserv. We were pleased to receive many positive comments about the value of CHE listservs, and we were grateful as well for the feedback about how we might improve this core CHE service. Following CHE’s core values of civility and transparency, we share the survey results as of mid December in a spreadsheet. We did not edit typographical errors, but we did remove names of respondents and people identified in comments (other than a few references to group coordinators). Where appropriate, CHE staff have added a few preliminary responses to comments.

In the coming weeks and months we will be evaluating the feedback we received. As we decide on changes or refinements to the listservs we will be communicating with our partners. Additionally, we invite further comments on this post and survey results.

We thank all those CHE Partners who completed the surveys (some of you who are subscribed to several listservs even completed several of them—thank you!). We value your feedback.

In gratitude for your continued collaboration with CHE, and all your efforts to make this world a healthier place for all,
The CHE team

See the survey results.